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4 edition of Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans found in the catalog.

Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans

Edwin Miller Fogel

Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans

  • 195 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by American Germanica Press in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Folklore -- Pennsylvania.,
  • Folklore -- Germany.,
  • Pennsylvania Dutch.,
  • Superstition.,
  • Pennsylvania German dialect.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesAmericana germanica / Editor: Marion Dexter Learned. New ser -- no. 18, Library of American civilization -- LAC 14823.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationiv, 387 p.
    Number of Pages387
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17557841M


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Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans by Edwin Miller Fogel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans Hardcover – by Edwin Miller Fogel (Author)5/5(3). Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans [Fogel, Edwin Miller] on blackgoldstampede.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This is a pre historical reproduction that was curated for quality.

Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process.5/5(3).

Since its publication inBeliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans has been not only a valuable addition to the catalog of American folklore but also a vital resource in preserving a linguistic culture and traditions that were already fading from the American blackgoldstampede.com: Edwin Miller Fogel.

Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans [Edwin Miller Fogel] on blackgoldstampede.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition)5/5(3). Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Beliefs and superstitions of the Pen Ratings: 0. Description.

Learn about the superstitions and beliefs the Pa Germans had long ago and some still do. Topic in this book includes horseshoes, folk medicine, omans/ wishes, future husband, warts, whooping cough and much more unique topics.

Nov 15,  · Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans by Fogel, Edwin Miller, Publication date Topics Folklore, Folklore, Pennsylvania Dutch, Superstition, Pennsylvania German dialect Publisher Philadelphia: American Germanica Press Collection cornell; americana.

Internet Archive BookReader Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. Sep 13,  · Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans by Fogel, Edwin Miller, Publication date Topics Folklore -- Pennsylvania, Folklore -- Germany, Pennsylvania Dutch, Superstition, Pennsylvania German dialect Publisher Philadelphia: American Germanica Press CollectionPages: Oct 27,  · "Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans," written in by Edwin Miller Fogel, a scholar of German language and its Pennsylvania dialects, documents more than 2, superstitions.

Edwin Miller Fogel is the author of Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Beliefs.

Excerpt. The aim of the present volume is two-fold. It is in tended primarily as a contribution not only to American Folklore but more especially as a chapter in the larger field of German American relations, the pioneer exponent of which is the present Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literatures in the University of Pennsylvania.

Edwin Miller Fogel. Since its publication inBeliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans has been not only a valuable addition to the catalogue of American folklore but also a vital resource in preserving a linguistic culture and traditions that were already fading from the American consciousness.

Where, Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans book the other hand, the Christian infiuence predominates, Fri- day is the unluckiest of days, and nothing of importance must be done on Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans book day, not even travelling.

These, then, are a few survivals of Germanic heathen- dom in Pennsylvania German superstitions. READ BOOK Beliefs And Superstitions Of The Pennsylvania Germans, password pro facebook hack b2ff6ad [Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania .or download the PDF of this book blackgoldstampede.coms and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans [Edwin Miller Fogel] on blackgoldstampede.com exact replica of a book Pennsylvania Germanshttp.

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Full text of "Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans". Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. Philadelphia, American Germanica Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Fogel, Edwin Miller, Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans.

Philadelphia, American Germanica Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Edwin Miller Fogel. Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study.

The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. OCLC Number: Notes: The section Sex, was included in the table of contents of his work Beliefs and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans, but was avaiable only by request from the author as a specially printed fascicle.

More than 2, beliefs and superstitions are included in both the Pennsylvania German language and the English translation. They are arranged here according to subjects such as childhood, marriage, omens, dogs and cats, moving, servants, milk and butter, trees, snakes, weather, moon, special days and seasons, horseshoes, freckles, warts, convulsions, and more.

Published in and based on a paper presented at the Pennsylvania German Society’s annual meeting inThe Folklore of the Pennsylvania Germans constitutes one of the first collections of Pennsylvania German stories, rhymes, and ballads (most in their native dialect).

Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. Edwin. Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans Rauch's Pennsylvania Dutch hand-book: a book for instruction = Rauch's Pennsylvania Deitsch hond-booch: en booch for inshtructa.

Popular Home Remedies and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans by Warren, William Fairfield and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at blackgoldstampede.com Clifton Johnson: What they say in New England.

(This volume contains several hundred New-England superstitions.) Edwin Miller Fogel: Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. (This volume contains separate superstitions). Periodical Publications. Folk-Lore. A quarterly review. London. The Journal of American Folk.

Author's Note: 10 Wacky Birthday Superstitions. After more than eight years as a writer, this was one of my most difficult articles to research. That definitely surprised me, as it seems like such a simple topic. The truth is, beyond blowing out the candles and making a silent wish, I knew of very few birthday blackgoldstampede.com: Bambi Turner.

Apr 25,  · Almost everyone who has lived in Pennsylvania for any length of time is familiar with the Pennsylvania Dutch to some extent.

However, many people know very little about the culture, and many people don’t even know that the Pennsylvania Dutch aren’t even Dutch at all, but rather Germans who settled in the area during colonial times. IMPORTANT BOOKS IN SHORT REVIEWS.; Dr. Fogel's Collection of Beliefs and Superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans -- Publications in Various Fields of Literature BELIEFS AND SUPERSTITION OF.

The core of the book consists of about 50 hymns written mostly by 16th century German Anabaptists, many imprisoned in castle dungeons for their religious beliefs. Therefore, the tone of many hymns is one of great sorrow, loneliness or protest against the world of wickedness.

Pennsylvania German, 17th- and 18th-century German-speaking settlers in Pennsylvania and their descendants. Emigrating from southern Germany (Palatinate, Bavaria, Saxony, etc.) and Switzerland, they settled primarily in the southeastern section of Pennsylvania, where they practiced any of several.

Dec 18,  · The culture, customs and Christmas traditions of these “Pennsylvania Germans” or “Pennsylvania Dutch,” as they came to be called, were the subject of a Dec.

7 presentation by Debbie Hartman of the Lebanon County Cooperative Extension’s Cooking Institute. The Pennsylvania Dutch (also called Pennsylvania Germans or Pennsylvania Deutsch) are descendants of early German immigrants to Pennsylvania. They are made up of a range of religious groups including Amish, Mennonite-Lutheran, German Reformed, Moravian, and others.

Get this from a library. Popular home remedies and superstitions of the Pennsylvania Germans. [A Monroe Aurand]. Oct 27,  · Superstitions: beliefs or notions not based on reason or knowledge in or of the ominous significance of a particular thing, circumstance, occurrence, proceeding, or the like.

Many of the common superstitions we recognize today--walking under a ladder, breaking a mirror, opening an umbrella indoors--originated well before Washington’s blackgoldstampede.comees: The Pennsylvania Dutch (Pennsilfaanisch-Deitsche), also referred to as the Pennsylvania Germans, are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania and their descendants.

This older usage of the word Dutch refers to the German settlers, known endonymically as Deutsch (in standard German) or Deitsch (in the principal dialect they spoke, Palatine German); it. The authors of the present volume have found almost 4, superstitions in Kentucky. As Pennsylvania Germans and Kentuckians are in general probably much more conservative than the average of Americans, inherited beliefs doubtless persist with exceptional strength among them; yet superstitions, it may safely be said, have disappeared entirely.

The observance of Groundhog Day in the United States first occurred in German communities in Pennsylvania, according to known records. The earliest mention of Groundhog Day is an entry on February 2,in the diary of James L. Morris of Morgantown, in Pennsylvania Dutch Country, according to the book on the subject by Don blackgoldstampede.com: 2nd February.

Many superstitious people say breaking a mirror sets you up for 7 years of bad luck. That may be because 7 years is the time it takes to replace all the cells in your physical body. Mar 09,  · Number 2, Powwowing in Pennsylvania: Healing Rituals of the Dutch Country features artifacts, documents and photographs illustrating a wide range of expression within the ritual tradition of over three centuries of Pennsylvania Dutch folk.

Mennonite and Amish Folklore and Folk Arts Ervin Beck Professor Emeritus of English Goshen College Goshen,Indiana August With thanks to Lon Sherer, Linda Kimpel, Linda Rouch and others for technical assistance. To suggest corrections or additions to this bibliography, e-mail: [email protected] Foreword Because so many elements of Amish and Mennonite culture are transmitted orally.

The history in cities like Philadelphia is unmatched in the country, with the state overflowing with superlative historic sites and an impressively diverse ethnic population.

Head out into the countryside, which makes up the vast majority of the state, and you’ll discover Pennsylvania Dutch Country and plenty of pockets of German immigrants. Aug 26,  · 9 Crazy Old Superstitions That People Actually Believed. you'll have at least heard of old beliefs — bad luck comes in threes, Another Roman superstition for our books, this one from the.Amish Religious Beliefs Pennsylvania Amish Beliefs Culture.

The Amish church began in the late s as a branch of the Anabaptist movement. Due to heavy religious persecution, many Amish fled to Pennsylvania for religious freedom. Today, new members join the Amish Church by getting baptized, typically between the ages of 16 and